Tag Archives: feminism

She Yearns For A Hug

Required reading in high school was always daunting.

My high school didn’t offer Creative Writing as an English class while I was there, which bothered me to no end. I gladly would have taken that class instead of AP English Language. I tested out of the remedial 101/102 classes when I headed off to college. I knew I would, so I felt absolutely no disappointment when I scored a two on both my AP English tests.

Out of the many books we were required to read, I enjoyed only a few. King Lear, Romeo & Juliet, Regeneration, All Quiet On The Western Front; these books I happily read. I barreled through The Great Gatsby even, but didn’t really enjoy it until choosing to read it again a decade later. Everything else, though, I don’t remember reading.

There was one book that stood out. I devoured every page and wanted the story to never finish. I cried, I smiled, I fell madly in love with the art of storytelling. The book shocked me, and it seemed to speak to me directly. I felt as though the author wrote this book specifically and solely for me.

I’m certain I was required to read this book twice in high school. Or, I was required once, and decided to reread it for an elective book for different class. Whatever the case, I happily read it again.

This is a book that I feel everyone who speaks English should read, even if English is not their native tongue. It’s a famous story, but often not fully understood. You can say the title and people immediately recognize it. But, that doesn’t mean they’ve read it. People usually think of the horror movies that take very loose liberty with the plot. To this day, especially now, I find myself having to describe the plot and talk about the incredibly obvious themes, and explain that, while entertaining, the cheesy B-List horror movies that people automatically think of are somewhat of a disgrace, as there is so much more oomph and depth and enlightenment to the actual story.

Can you guess what the book is yet? I’m sure some of you can. If you’ve taken any honors English classes in high school or are an English Literature major, well, duh. Of course you should be able to guess!

My copy from high school started to fall apart a long time ago. It kept me company when I went off to college the first time round. About six or seven years ago, I finally replaced my well worn copy. This new(er) copy remains present on my nightstand. Sometimes, it gets place on my bookshelf if I’m engrossed in other books. Whatever the case, it is within reach. I have periods in my life that seem heavier, darker, and more introspective. This is when I really yearn for this book. I always want to get lost in the story, hoping to find a different answer or clue. I know that whilst getting lost in the words, I’ll come through the experience renewed and hopeful. People have often questioned why. There isn’t a concrete explanation as to why. I just know that the themes of loss & yearning, motherhood (creation, compassion), consciousness, free will, and good v. evil speak volumes to my soul. You have a man playing God, and let’s be real, he’s not very successful. We have a champion, a hero in this story, and it’s certainly not the man playing God. At least, I don’t find him to be any kind of hero. I hope that those of you who’ve read this book agree with me, or can, at least, understand where I am coming from.

If you haven’t guessed the book by now, shame on you! No, I kid. You don’t have to know what it is.

The one book that I keep coming back to is Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. Holy hell, this book is phenomenal. It cranks my gears. It makes me happy. It inspires me to read and write and create. For me, Frankenstein is one of those stories that stands the test of time. It touches on humanity in such a way that, even in our tech savvy times, we can all pick a theme or three from it, and acknowledge them within ourselves.

Seriously, though, if you haven’t read it already, go read it as soon as possible. Take your time with it. Digest it. Let the words dance around your mind. Then, go give your loved ones a hug.

Second Time Around

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Goals!

In a previous post, I discussed doing a feminist reading challenge. Please check out the post to get a better idea of what I’m talking about.

So, guess what? I failed to complete it. I didn’t even pick up one book off the list. Sure, I decided to start the challenge in August just before embarking on a full course load for my paralegal program.

Anyway. I’ve decided to transfer the challenge over to 2014 and add a few books to the list. I shall challenge myself to read 10-12 feminist themed books.

The books I hope to read (or reread) are:
1. The Handmaid’s Tale, Margaret Atwood
2. The Diary of a Young Girl, Anne Frank
3. Hunger Games, Suzanne Collins
4. Catching Fire, Suzanne Collins
5. Mockingjay, Suzanne Collins
6. How To Be A Woman, Caitlin Moran
7. The Bell Jar, Sylvia Plath
8. Alanna: The First Adventure, Tamora Pierce
9. How The Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents, Julia Alvarez
10. Wide Sargasso Sea, Jean Rhys
11. Fear of Flying, Erica Jong
12. Bastard Out Of Carolina, Dorothy Allison

So, there you go. There is my list. Luckily, I own most of these books, so I don’t have an excuse to not read them. And, I officially have 13 months to get them read. Between quarters I’ll devote time to reading for pleasure. And, while school is in session, I’ll reach for a book instead of Netflix as a treat for finishing school work. My brain needs exercise, right??

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Small Business Bookshop

During my childhood, my goal in life was to be a writer and own a small bookstore that sold used books and independently published books and magazines (that were forward thinking and world peace positive). At 31, I still have that dream. But, in the technological, economically rough time we are living in, I understand how difficult and unlikely that dream is. During my teens and early twenties, I wanted the bookstore to also be a cafe & meeting place for students, radicals, progressives, anarchists, and all people non-mainstream. I wanted a place for people to feel safe, have a coffee, and somewhere comfortable to sit with a book to read or a conversation to be had. In Menlo Park, Kepler’s was the place to be. It started as a counter-culture meeting place a couple decades before I was born and became the intelligent, independent, book selling hub of the Peninsula (with Berkeley a 45 minute drive away). While I went to college in Washington State, Auntie’s Bookstore in Spokane was the only real option I had for finding solace in my dream. And, I sadly only went in two or three times during the three years I was up there.

Lately, I’ve been itching to move. There’s a part of me that wants to move back to Cheney/Spokane and get some final closure. I left so abruptly when I actually did leave ten years ago. I want to go back to EWU, finish my degree, and start the ball rolling on some sort of progressive, positive hub/hive/social network that I feel that part of the state desperately needs.

But, with Auntie’s as the mainstay and iconic indie place of Spokane, I know my idea of an independent Salon/Bookstore/Cafe wouldn’t stand up to Auntie’s. There is no need for an identical business that is part of a dwindling business circle. But, what if I opened a Salon/Cafe? What if people would leave a book they’ve read and took a book they want to read? What if independent writers came and lead a Salon a couple times a month? What if…??

I’m partially on the way to fulfilling my dream. I’m actively doing part of my dream by writing this post. And, I’m cultivating the ambition to figure out a way to have my goals come to life.

I guess what I’m trying to say is HELP. If anyone out there want to join in on my fantastically fun goal of creating a Salon type Cafe in Eastern Washington, please, jump on the bandwagon. Let’s get this going.

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2013 Feminist Reads Challenge

While browsing through nerdy, book lover blogs, I came across an interesting post. The Hiding Spot is doing a Feminist Reads Challenge, something I am always eager to participate in. The challenge requires that the books feature a strong female lead character, positive support for the female gender, and a basic (or intensive) support of feminism as a whole. There are three challenge levels: easy (5 books), medium (5-10 books), and hard (10+ books). As we are now in August, I will feel most comfortable going the easy route. If I weren’t back at school, I’d go medium!

The books I hope to read (or reread) are:
1. The Handmaid’s Tale, Margaret Atwood
2. The Diary of a Young Girl, Anne Frank
3. Hunger Games, Suzanne Collins
4. How To Be A Woman, Caitlin Moran
5. The Bell Jar, Sylvia Plath
(and bonus books, just in case)
6. Alanna: The First Adventure, Tamora Pierce
7. How The Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents, Julia Alvarez

I’ll update my Books To Read 2013 list to include these. In fact, I think I have to rework the choices on my list! School is a priority, however, I have six weeks off school before Fall Quarter starts. Hopefully, I can read a book per week.

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I Am Half The Sky

Two years ago, my mother bought me a book for Christmas. It sat on my bookshelf up until recently. Now, I am kicking myself for not reading it when I received it, as it has turned into this amazing phenomenon. On October 1st & 2nd, PBS hosted a four hour documentary, the visual tie-in to the book I was gifted.

As “Half The Sky” sat within walking distance of me for almost two years, I always made a note to start reading it. Now, with the PBS documentary aired and an amazing movement brewing, I vow to read the book & watch the documentary, all the while taking notes. I have signed up to become a Community Ambassador & hope to host screenings of the documentary in my neighborhood & community. If accepted, this will be a great way to do something of substance with my life. It will act as a form of education for me, as well as allow more people to get involved with a great movement and work together to build better opportunities for women & children to get the best lives possible.

Please, enjoy the trailer. And, subscribe!

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